VIDEO: Moving from Faux Omni-channel to Unified Commerce

According to the 2016 POS/Customer Engagement Survey, many retailers have taken the “just get something done” approach over the last few years to attempt to deliver a cross-channel/unified commerce experience. The unfortunate result of this quick fix approach is a “faux” omni-channel model that doesn’t execute as promised and risks disappointing customers.

Watch this video blog post to hear Ken Morris, Principal, Boston Retail Partners, explain why many retailers are saddled with legacy systems that are not designed to accommodate today’s retail environment and how they have scrambled to cobble things together in attempts to deliver the omni-channel capabilities customers expect. Ken also shares his perspectives on the best approach to move to unified commerce.

Moving from Faux Omni-channel to Unified Commerce

Visit our BRP Videos page to watch videos on other topics.

As always, I appreciate you thoughts on this topic. Please enter your thoughts and comments below.

David

Vice President of Marketing
David has more than 15 years of experience marketing to retail and hospitality companies. His broad marketing experience is focused on designing and executing successful strategic marketing plans, demand generation, public relations and branding through customer-centric messaging. He has significant experience marketing retail technology and services with an emphasis on POS systems.

LinkedIn 

2 replies
  1. Izzie
    Izzie says:

    Hi – this is very interesting, thank you. Why do you think US department stores have been (relatively) successful at making the transition to omnichannel? Some of them already generate c1/4 of sales online, but by and large retailers especially in luxury have been extremely slow at implementing “real” omnichannel like you say.

    Reply
  2. David Naumann
    David Naumann says:

    According to BRP’s 2016 POS/Customer Engagement Survey, only 18% of the retailers surveyed indicate they have implemented a unified commerce/single commerce platform, and two-thirds of those companies indicated that it “needs improvement.” While many U.S. retailers are rushing to deliver omni-channel services, most are not doing it very effectively. The reason is because it is very difficult.

    “Saddled with legacy systems that are not designed to accommodate today’s retail environment, retailers have scrambled to cobble things together in attempts to deliver the omni-channel capabilities customers expect,” said Ken Morris, principal, Boston Retail Partners. “Retailers need to invest in infrastructure, networks and service oriented architecture (SOA) layer and do it right.”

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *